Cuillin Bantock

Painter

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The paintings

The linocuts

Recollections of Barnt Green 1942-1955

Bounty: A case of preposterous optimism

Origin 2004

Biography

Principal exhibitions

Publications

Bibliography

Workshops & lectures

A spot on the wall

Traethdy

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

1. Essay by Geoffrey Rigden, 1994

2. ‘Clevedon – Sharing a View’, by Peter Davies, 1997

3. Review, Hampstead and Highgate Express, by Linda Talbot, 1998

4. Entry in Dictionary of British Artists, David Buckman, 1998

5. Review, Socialist Future, by Corinna Lotz, 1998

6. Review, Highbury and Islington Express, by Morgan Falconer, 1999

7. ‘A Good Age’ , The Guardian, Craig Taylor, 2005

8. 
Essay by Geoffrey Rigden, 2008

9. Simply Does It, Bonnie Friend, The Glass Magazine, 2014

"Processes of nature are evinced...Bantock’s landscapeness is in the essence of a place rather than in its appearance . . . making pictorially explicit the 'action of forces' that is palpable in wild terrain. . . . A tautness prevails, a sense of compressed energy like seeds about to burst from their pod. . . . In the watercolours . . . delicacy and boldness, control and randomness are nicely balanced in a 'jungly' way."

Geoffrey Rigden (1994)


"His work reminds me of . . . Milton Avery's . . . the way he strikes a mysterious balance between abstraction of surface colour and a tentative illusion of landscape imagery . . . his skill as a colourist, displaying in the simplest terms imaginable wonderful and subtle mixtures of hue, at once decorative and a fulfillment of the interior designer's criterion of haut decoratif. His tonal gifts . . . speak of his musical background."

Peter Davies


"Bantock is an accomplished colourist . . . and has a clear identity; his paintings are effortlessly atmospheric, contemplative, yet rife with conviction. The mystical Before the Moon and Sixpence places a calm convergence of form against a misty ground. In Clevedon Raw, a generous sweep of  deep blue and a decisive red element are laid with a purposeful white form. He is equally persuasive on a small scale, with positive strokes on a nebulous ground, like the interjections of sudden thoughts."

Linda Talbot

 

"Cuillin Bantock creates an extraordinary sensation of infinite space."

Corinna Lotz

 

"For him painting is a highly formal process, a matter of careful thought as much as intuition...pure painterly abstraction with a light, high-keyed palette. Bantock's is painters' painting: post-war styles learnt from the more contem- plative schools . . . in the tradition of Milton Avery . . . Morandi. The scientific training has brought a rigour to his thinking about art which many artists lack entirely . . . a confident and well-digested understanding of modern painting. This is the mind of an able thinker . . . the language of abstraction, its sheer challenge, has demanded his attention."

Morgan Falconer


"Thus his colour became more aerated and delicate, the design clarified and a drum-like tautness achieved...it is not inappropriate to compare these luminous, eloquent, understated works with the 'expressive emptiness' of Milton Avery - another habitué of dunes - and their shared mood of eirence and sublimity."

Geoffrey Rigden (2008)

"Wonderfully liberating...space, in every sense. Between the subject matter and the execution is the quest for simplicity. When you really look, the layered colours, carefully chosen hues, the curious precision of select shapes...you realise that the simplicity in actual fact is anything but simple."

Bonnie Friend (2014)

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